Quick Overview of the HP Z27Q 5K 10-bit Monitor

It seems that the HP Z27Q monitor is still one of the few 5K displays available on the market these days boasting a maximum native resolution of the whopping 5120×2880 pixels. Just like the 27″ iMac with 5K Retina Display and Dell’s 27-inch Dell UP2715K, the HP Z27Q has a 10-bit panel capable of displaying 1.07 billion colors, 16:9 aspect ratio along with settings for both the standard sRGB and the wider AdobeRGB color space, and costs a few hundred dollars less than the Dell’s 27-inch flagship UP2715K monitor.

Unlike its sibling the HP Z27X though, the newer HP Z27Q lacks support for Rec. 2020 colour space and an option for DCI, but it still covers BT.709 and features a 14-bit 3D Look-Up-Table. It’s worth noting that due to the higher resolution, the monitor has no HDMI or DVI inputs as an option. There are only two Display Port 1.2 connectors as these both need to be utilized to drive the monitor at the maximum 5K resolution.


HP Z27Q 5K Monitor Specifications:

  • Maximum Resolution – 5120×[email protected]
  • Viewable Size – 27-inch
  • Panel Type -10-bit IPS Panel (1.07 billion)
  • Native Aspect Ratio – 16:9
  • Supported Gamut – sRGB, Adobe RGB, Rec. 709
  • Brightness – 300 cd/m2
  • Contrast Ratio – 1000:1
  • Response Time – 14ms
  • Viewing Angle – 178°/178°
  • Screen Treatment -Anti-Glare
  • Video Inputs – 2 x DisplayPort 1.2
  • Additional Features – 4 x USB 3.0 output
  • Price – $1,300

As expected, this monitor is also a bandwidth-hungry beast as it requires a lot of resources to run at the maximum resolution. For instance, DisplayPort 1.2, which is the current standard, has enough bandwidth to run only UHD or 3840×2160 content at 60Hz.

In order to drive 5K, two DisplayPort 1.2 outputs need to be tied together to support and properly display 5120×2880 pixels at 60Hz. Further, there are 4 USB 3.0 ports as an additional feature two of which are placed on the back of the display, and another two on the left side.


The HP Z27Q comes with a modest, but functional design, it’s mainly built of plastic, yet there is a full-fledged stand that provides a variety of tilt, swivel, and height adjustments. Optionally, you have a VESA mount option provided as well, so mounting it on a wall shouldn’t be a something to worry about.

Ultimately, the monitor comes with a relatively reasonable price tag of $1,300, especially considering the price of other units in this segment, plus it provides a decent performance for a 5K display. Unfortunately, it doesn’t cover the Rec.2020 colour gamut, but it still comes with plenty of other features for the price.

So, if you want to get smoother gradations, clearer images, and rich color presentation on all your projects from the professional grade, 10-bit color quality and up to 1.07 billion colors, the HP Z27Q has got you covered.

[source: anandtech.com]

B&H Links:

HP Z27q 27″ Widescreen LED Backlit LCD Monitor – $1,299

HP 27″ Z27X DreamColor LED Backlit Professional LCD Display – $ 1,051.00

Dell UP2715K 27″ UltraSharp 27 Ultra HD 5K LED-Backlit IPS Monitor – $ 1,636.40

Apple 27″ iMac with Retina 5K Display (Late 2015) – $ 1,749.00

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  • Ivo

    Both iMac and Dell 5K screens are technically handled as two screens by their inner electronics, causing some problems in certain applications. I’d love to know how HP solved this problem, is this truly native 5K screen?