Fujifilm X-T30: Lightweight, 4K Budget Mirrorless Camera

Fujifilm have announced an even cheaper, or rather, budget-friendlier version of the X-T3, called the Fujifilm X-T30. Much like they did with the X-T2 and the following X-T20 variant, Fujifilm have once again managed to make a really useful and compact APS-C mirrorless camera without too much compromises.

The X-T20 had a few more limitations in the video department compared to the X-T2, but with the new X-T30, Fuji have managed to pack the new model with some of the best features from the X-T3 – namely the 425-point Phase Detect autofocus system, the 4K/30p recording with F-Log and also the included Film Simulations such as ETERNA, ASTIA, PRO Neg, and others that Fuji are famous for.

We don’t get 4K/60p on the Fuji X-T30, but this is to be expected – after all they have to limit some features; the Fuji X-T30 also does not get H.265 – the internal 4K recording is in 8bit 4:2:0 H.264, which may be limiting to some, but there is a 4K HDMI output that allows for 10bit 4:2:2 recording to an external recorder such as the Atomos Ninja V for example.

The X-T30 even supports 4K DCI spec (4096 x 2160) recording and supersamples the video from a 6K (6240 x 3510) imaging area (using the full sensor in other words) to produce stunning quality imagery in 4K for for more detail and sharper look, free of moire or aliasing. The 4K however seems to be limited to around 10 minutes at a time, which is a downside.

Fujifilm X-T30

At $899, the Fuji X-T30 looks like a hell of a B-camera to the X-T3 or even a main camera for content creators or photographers, who prefer lighter gear, but still want to get the benefit of a great AF system, a terrific APS-C sensor and that sweet Fuji colour science and look.

The new Fujifilm X-T30 inherits some popular exterior design features of the X-T20, while adopting a new grip design that makes the camera body sit comfortably in your hand. Examples of some design changes include the “Focus Lever”, which now replaces the “Selector Button” to afford extra grip space at the rear.

The rear LCD monitor uses a touchscreen panel display 1.3mm thinner than that on the X-T20. Its improved touchscreen response enables faster and more intuitive camera operations. The X-T30 is available in the popular Black version the Silver version for a premium look with greater sheen, and the Charcoal Silver version for those that care about how the camera looks.

Fujifilm X-T30 LCD back

Fujifilm X-T30 Features:

  • 26.1 Megapixel APS-C “X-Trans” BSI CMOS Sensor
  • X-Processor 4 with Quad CPU
  • 425-Point Phase-Detection Autofocus
  • 4K DCI and UHD Video 8bit 4:2:0 internal:
    • 4096 x 2160p at 23.98/24/25/29.97 fps
    • 3840 x 2160p at 23.98/24/25/29.97 fps
    • 1080/120fps Slow-Motion
  • F-Log Gamma & ETERNA Film Simulation + more
  • HDMI output – 10bit 4:2:2
  • 1 x SD cards slot
  • No headphone output
  • 2.36m-Dot OLED Electronic Viewfinder
  • 30fps Blackout Free Shooting
  • Monochrome Adjustment
  • Advanced SR Auto
  • 3.0″ 1.04m-Dot Tilting LCD Touchscreen
  • Extended ISO 80-51200
  • Bluetooth and Wi-Fi
  • Weighs just 383g!
  • Price: $899 at B&H/Adorama

The Fuji X-T3 omits a headphone output and has only a single UHS-1 SD card slot, which can be a bit frustrating to some, but those limitations are understandable given the price point at which the camera is offered.

Fuji say their AF algorithm has been improved along with the accuracy of face/eye detection AF. The ability to detect faces in the distance has been enhanced by approximately 30% and AF tracking is now more stable, even when an obstacle appears in the way and this apparently works well in both stills as well as video, making the X-T30 and Fuji X-T3 suitable for gimbal work, events and sit down interviews with “animated” subjects.

Comparison movie between X-T3 Firmware ver. 2.00 and X-T30/X-T3 firmware ver. 3.00:

For full specs and more details on the new Fuji X-T30 head over to Fujifilm.

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